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Friday, December 20, 2013

"Sitting outside of the circle" is an essential tool for cognitive coaching. Here is one way to implement it in classrooms. Courtesy of ASCD SmartBrief.


Video modeling helps educators teach social skills to young students
Educators in a school district in Minnesota are using video modeling in their early-childhood classrooms to highlight appropriate behaviors and emotional and social skills. Teachers record and then play videos on tablets or interactive whiteboards of children demonstrating appropriate play, classroom and social behaviors, such as sitting during circle time. "It can help a lot of kids learn how to do routines or how to play with toys more efficiently," teacher Sarah Murray said. KARE-TV (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.) (12/10)Bookmark and Share

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Resilience is a learned trait and is necessary for students to live in today's world. Here's a great article on how educators can support students in this process. Courtesy of ASCD SmartBrief.


How resilience can help both leaders and students
To help children develop resilience, school leaders must first be able to meet and handle adversity, write K-12 leadership experts Jill Berkowicz and Ann Myers in this blog post. In addition, they suggest that educators create an environment where a set of protective factors is in place to create a school climate that fosters resilience. "Our schools and districts need to become focused on helping students to develop the social/emotional skills required to be resilient and healthy," they write. Education Week/Leadership 360 blog (11/17)Bookmark and Share

Saturday, December 7, 2013

Concentration is a learned skilled - and has become a major issue in education over the last 5-10 years. The following article has some suggestions that are easily implemented. Courtesy of ASCD SmartBrief.

Do today's connected students need lessons on concentration?
Schools should include lessons on how to concentrate to help students stay on track amid numerous digital distractions, said psychologist Daniel Goleman, who has written books about social and emotional learning. Goleman calls for digital-free work periods during the day and lessons on mindfulness practices. 

"It's about using the devices smartly but having the capacity to concentrate as you need to, when you want to," he said. KQED.org/Mind/Shift blog (12/5)Bookmark and Share